You are browsing the archive for 2013 May 07.

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Sen. Paul Urges Consideration of Immigration Bill at HSGAC Hearing

May 7, 2013 in Politics & Elections

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Sen. Rand Paul today spoke before his colleagues on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC) and urged for the immigration bill to be debated and amended before the committee. This committee markup would ensure that the border and national security provisions are strong enough for passage in both the House of Representatives and Senate. In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, Sen. Paul believes that we must take the time necessary to find out how our immigration and screening process failed before we pass legislation to legalize millions of people.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH SEN. PAUL’S STATEMENTS

Transcript:
SEN. PAUL: Mr. Chairman, thank you for bringing this distinguished panel here. I for one am for immigration reform. I think we should embrace immigrants as assets, people who want to come and find the American Dream. If you want to work, and you come to our country, I think we can find a place for you. That being said, I am worried that the bill before us won’t pass. It may pass in the Senate, may not pass the House. I want to be constructive in making the bill strong enough that conservatives, myself included, conservatives in the house will vote on the bill because I think immigration reform is something we should do.
In this bill I am worried though, and this is similar to what Senator Johnson said, that it says, well you have to have a plan to build a fence but you don’t have to build a fence. And if you don’t have a plan to build the fence then you get a commission. I don’t know what happens if the commission doesn’t do anything. That’s the story of Washington around here.
To me it’s a little bit like Obamacare-and I hate to bring that up-but 1800 references to the secretary shall at a later date decide things. We don’t write bills around here. We should write the bill, we should write the plan, we should do these things to secure the border whether it be fence, entry/exit. We should write it. Not delegate it because what’s going to happen is in five years, if they don’t do their jobs— it may not even be them [the panel], it maybe somebody else who doesn’t do their job in five years-and the border isn’t secure, we will be …read more

Source: RAND PAUL

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My Big Virginity Mistake

May 7, 2013 in Blogs

By Jessica Ciencin Henriquez, Salon

I took an abstinence pledge hoping it would ensure a strong marriage. Instead, it led to a quick divorce


I was 14 years old when I married Jesus. Not Jesus, the Panamanian who worked at Six Flags. I mean Jesus Christ, the Lord. My parents sent me off to Baptist youth camp in Panama City Beach for the week, and I came home with a tan and a purity ring. I sat with my legs crossed, cramped in a theater with 200 sweaty, sobbing teens as our pastor described the unwavering bonds of sex and why it should only be experienced within the confines of marriage.

The lyrics echoed in the background as he shouted about STDs and unplanned pregnancy from the pulpit. Cause I am waiting for you, praying for you darling, wait for me too, wait for me as I wait for you. One by one we each placed a ring on our fourth finger and made vows to an apparently bi-curious Jesus who took teenage husbands and wives by the dozen that night.

I didn’t buy into a word of it. Jesus as my husband: Were they kidding? But that ring! Silver and engraved with entwined hearts – everyone I knew was wearing one and I’d finally been given the opportunity to get my hands on it. And it wasn’t just the ring. This was a movement with T-shirts and hats and the added bonus of superiority over kids in school who couldn’t keep their clothes on, those sinners. After an intense and very detailed sex talk with my mother , where she stuttered and I blushed and we both used the word “flower,” I was terrified of sex. That and the slide show in sex ed didn’t help one bit. So I scribbled Jesus + Jess on my Bible cover, and I casually mentioned my virginity in daily conversations. I committed to the idea hoping it would ensure a successful marriage. Instead, it led to my divorce.

I don’t know many people these days who married still a virgin. But going to high school in the furniture …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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The Minimum Wage Delusion, and the Death of Common Sense

May 7, 2013 in Economics

By James A. Dorn

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James A. Dorn

Senator Edward Kennedy once called the minimum wage “one of the best antipoverty programs we have.” Jared Bernstein, former chief economist to Vice President Joe Biden, thinks “it raises the pay of low-wage workers without hurting their job prospects.” And Ralph Nader thinks low-wage workers deserve a pay increase—and the government should provide it.

Why do those beliefs persist in the face of common economic sense? No legislator has ever overturned the law of demand, which says that when the price of labor rises, the quantity demanded will fall (assuming other things are constant). That same law tells us that quantity demanded (i.e., the number of jobs for low-skilled workers) will decrease more in the long run than in the short run, as employers switch to labor-saving methods of production—and unemployment will increase.

The belief that increasing the minimum wage is socially beneficial is a delusion.”

The belief that increasing the minimum wage is socially beneficial is a delusion. It is short-sighted and ignores evident reality. Workers who retain their jobs are made better off but only at the expense of unskilled, mostly young, workers who either lose their jobs or can’t find a job at the legal minimum.

A higher minimum wage attracts new entrants but does not guarantee them a job. What happens on the demand side of the market is not surprising: if the minimum wage exceeds the prevailing market wage (determined by supply and demand), some workers will lose their jobs or have their hours cut. There is abundant evidence that a 10 percent increase in the minimum wage leads to a 1 to 3 percent decrease in employment of low-skilled workers (using teens as a proxy) in the short run, and to a larger decrease in the long run, along with rising unemployment.

Employers have more flexibility in the long run and will find ways to economize on the higher-priced labor. New technology will be introduced along with labor-saving capital investment, and skilled workers will tend to replace unskilled workers. Those substitutions will occur even before an increase in the minimum wage, if employers believe such an increase is imminent. There will be fewer jobs for low-skilled workers and higher unemployment rates—especially for minorities—and participation rates will fall as workers affected by the minimum wage drop out of the formal labor market.

The minimum wage violates the principle of freedom by limiting the range …read more

Source: OP-EDS

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California Supreme Court Upholds Local Medical Marijuana Bans

May 7, 2013 in PERSONAL LIBERTY

By drosenfeld

Statement from Drug Policy Alliance:  "The Only Way to Protect Patients is for California to Adopt State Wide Medical Marijuana Regulation"

Today, the California Supreme Court held that localities may entirely ban medical marijuana dispensaries from operating within their jurisdictions in a closely watched case, City of Riverside vs. Inland Empire Patients Health and Wellness Center. The result of the Court’s ruling is that tens of thousands of legitimate medical marijuana patients in California will be without safe and legal access to medical marijuana. To date more than 200 localities have banned dispensaries outright.

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Source: DRUG POLICY

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Sen. Paul Discusses Immigration Bill at Homeland Security and Gov't Affairs Hearing- 5/7/2013

May 7, 2013 in Politics & Elections

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Source: RAND PAUL

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What’s Wrong with Internet Sales Tax

May 7, 2013 in Economics

The Senate has passed a bill, known as the Marketplace Fairness Act, that would require large Internet retailers to collect sales taxes on all purchases for the state and local governments of the buyers. The bill now moves to the House, where the GOP is divided on the issue. Cato scholar Daniel J. Mitchell argues that this legislation is bad news for tax policy and bad news for privacy.

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Source: CATO HEADLINES