You are browsing the archive for 2013 June 03.

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New York State Assembly Passes Bill to Allow Medicinal Use of Marijuana in New York State

June 3, 2013 in PERSONAL LIBERTY

By drosenfeld

Passage Follows New Poll: 82% of New Yorkers Support Medical Marijuana, Including 81% of Both Democrats and Republicans

Healthcare Practitioners and Patients Urge New York Senate to Pass Bill Without Delay 

New York: Earlier today, the New York State Assembly passed the Compassionate Care Act (A.6357/Gottfried) by a vote of 95 to 38. The bill, which would create one the most tightly regulated medical marijuana programs in the country, would alleviate the suffering of thousands of seriously ill New Yorkers by allowing the use of marijuana to treat debilitating, life-threatening illnesses under a doctor’s supervision.

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Source: DRUG POLICY

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Freedom to Fish Act Signed Into Law

June 3, 2013 in Politics & Elections

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Freedom to Fish Act, which protects fishing access at the tailwaters of dams along the Cumberland River, was signed into law today by President Obama. The act, which was co-sponsored by Sen. Rand Paul, places a two-year moratorium on the Army Corps of Engineers’ plan to install physical barriers in several locations, including at the Barkley and Wolf Creek Dams. Following its enactment, Sen. Paul issued the following statement:
‘I am pleased Freedom to Fish has been signed into law – and I know I am speaking for many Kentuckians when I say that. The livelihoods of many business owners and fishermen were at stake, but because of this legislation’s enactment, they will continue to enjoy the freedom to fish without the bureaucratic overreach of the Army Corps.’
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Source: RAND PAUL

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The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism

June 3, 2013 in Economics

Liberal individualism, or “classical liberalism” as it is often called, refers to a political philosophy in which liberty plays the central role. In a new book, The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism, legendary scholar George H. Smith, an expert on libertarian and classical liberal philosophy, has produced an exceptional study of classical liberalism and the relations among such liberal ideas as individualism, natural rights, utilitarianism, self-sovereignty, and what Lord Acton called “the polar star of liberty.” It’s a college course in political philosophy in just 217 very readable pages.

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Source: CATO HEADLINES

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And the Actual Customers….

June 3, 2013 in Economics

By Peter G. Klein

U1rd7LY

Unlike clients of a government agency, customers of a commercial enterprise really are customers, representing potential profit, not cost. In contrast to the DMV sign I shared the other day, consider the sign below, spotted at a small restaurant (via Niels van der Linden).

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Supply Sider v. Austrian

June 3, 2013 in Economics

By Mark Thornton

Supply-side economist Nathan Lewis discusses the differences between Supply Side Economics and Austrian Economics (with respect to monetary policy) in Forbes. At first he goes on to attack the Austrians but ultimately he extends an olive branch in the form of the Classical pre-1913 Gold Standard.

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Rothbard on Statistics

June 3, 2013 in Economics

By Mark Thornton

Here is an early article by Murray Rothbard on government statistics. Someone needs to update and expand on these numbers.

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Obama Policy Is Positive Step, But Could Delay Real Reform

June 3, 2013 in Economics

By Alex Nowrasteh

Alex Nowrasteh

President Obama exercised his executive power to defer deportations for young unauthorized immigrants who can now apply for temporary work permits. Regardless of their legality, the president’s actions carry the miasma of an executive power grab. While the air of legal impropriety surrounding Obama’s action make long run immigration reform more difficult, we shouldn’t ignore the benefits of deferring deportations.

The president’s actions carry the miasma of an executive power grab.”

Deferring deportations for young unauthorized immigrants brought here as children allows people who are already American in every way but legally to stay here for a bit longer—perhaps until real immigration reform takes place. Many of these young people do not even remember the nation their parents took them from or speak any language besides English. Richmond teenager Heydi Mejia was brought here by her mother from Guatemala when she was 4 years old, and her knowledge of that country is limited to what she learned from Wikipedia and dinner table chats. She considers herself American.

Both native born Americans and immigrants like Heydi are made worse off by deportation. We lose the benefits of one more free and productive person, and Heydi loses decades of greater earned income, a higher standard of living, and the freedom to live where she chooses. If Americans want to employ, sell products to, and rent housing to Heydi, they should be allowed to without government enforced disqualifications based merely on birth location. Obama’s memo, however temporary and imperfect, at least takes a small step toward relieving the pain caused by our immigration policy.

The last time Obama used his prosecutorial discretion to review deportation cases, his administration promised to stop the deportations of unauthorized immigrants with strong American family ties and no criminal records. Since that policy went into effect in November 2011, Department of Homeland Security officials stopped deportations in a bare 2 percent of the 411,000 cases reviewed. Last week’s memo could be just a repeat of that.

Therein is the crux of the problem. The policy change that Obama introduced was a positive step, but because of his methods we cannot predict how far it will actually go or how long it will be enforced for. The goals of Obama’s memo are laudable but the process could delay real reform.

Alex Nowrasteh is an immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute.

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Source: OP-EDS

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Why Beijing Needs to Protect the Freedom of Its Critics

June 3, 2013 in Economics

By James A. Dorn

James A. Dorn

People’s trust in government erodes when there is no genuine rule of law to limit the power and scope of the ruling elite. The latest breach of trust in China is the discovery that more than 40 per cent of the rice supply in Guangzhou was tainted with cadmium, a toxic metal. The socialist idea that “power resides in the people” is a mantra without substance.

The truth is that leaders in the Chinese Communist Party and their crony capitalists are still above the law.

Trust in government can’t be built amid fear of reprisal.”

The lack of an effective constitution that protects basic human rights to life, liberty and property — including the right to free speech — means the politicisation of economic life, corruption and injustice. Without the right to freely express ideas and to criticise government abuses of power, the Chinese people are subservient to their state masters.

Freedom of the press and freedom of conscience are essential for the development of a harmonious society. The legitimate function of government is to safeguard people and property under the rule of law.

China’s leaders pay lip service to the rule of law but have no incentive to limit their power. Yet failing to allow what Nobel laureate economist Ronald Coase and his co-author Ning Wang call “a free market for ideas”, in the book How China Became Capitalist, means future innovation will face serious obstacles.

Without competition and criticism, the market discovery process cannot fully operate. People have to be free to write and think — and to spot and correct errors. A dynamic market system requires what the economist Joseph Schumpeter called “creative destruction”. There can be no creation without freedom and failure.

In the information economy, ideas matter. China was once a land of great inventors. It could become so again if people were free to exchange all kinds of ideas and not fear government reprisals. It is easy to trust a small government surrounded by a large free market — such as Hong Kong. The former British colony has a genuine rule of law but not yet democracy. Mainland China, too, could move in that direction.

China’s new leaders, President Xi Jinping and Premier Li Keqing , have promised to continue economic liberalisation, end corruption and strengthen the rule of law. Yet one sees repeated violations of that principle.

Chinese liberals continue to be harassed and …read more

Source: OP-EDS