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Where Are Protests against Murders of Christians?

August 28, 2013 in Economics

By Nat Hentoff

Nat Hentoff

Largely absent from nearly all our sources of news and commentary is deep, continuing coverage, if any, of the horrifying massacres of Christians in Egypt and especially Syria and the burning down of their churches.

The world’s most prominent Christian, Pope Francis, has denounced the violence, but our media has mostly ignored him, instead giving him a justly favorable response for his concern for the poor and otherwise vulnerable.

One of the few penetrating protesters of this violence is Rich Lowry, editor of the National Review:

“For the first time in 1,600 years, they didn’t pray this past Sunday at the Virgin Mary and Anba Abraam monastery in a village in southern Egypt.

“Islamists firebombed and looted the monastery, which dates back to the fifth century. For good measure, they destroyed a church inside. They then announced that they would be converting the monastery into a mosque” (“Egypt’s Anti-Christian Pogrom,” Lowry, National Review, Aug. 20).

He adds: “The Christian church was founded in Alexandria around 50 A.D. …

“None of recent regimes in Egypt — including the latest set of military rulers — has shown any interest in protecting them.”

And as for our president: “In his remarks after the bloodshed began in Egypt, President Barack Obama relegated his concern over the anti-Christian attacks to a three-word dependent clause at the end of one sentence.”

As for daily life in Egypt, Morning Star News reported that earlier this month, “a Coptic Christian girl walking home from a Bible class at her church was shot and killed … in Cairo by an unidentified gunman, human rights activists said.”

The girl’s uncle, a church pastor, said “he didn’t know for sure if the shooting was religiously motivated but quickly added that violence against Christians ‘seems to be normal’ in Egypt now” (“Coptic Christian Girl Shot Dead in Egypt,” Morning Star News, Aug. 9).

Meanwhile in Syria, “the nation’s 2 million-plus Christians are caught in the middle of a Muslim war.

“Jihadist rebels threaten and kidnap them while coercing others to become Muslims. Government troops loyal to President Bashar Assad order them to fight the opposition or face death” (“Christians are in the crosshairs of bloody Muslim wars in Mideast,” Rowan Scarborough, The Washington Times, Aug. 1).

But in spite of all this, says John Hayward of Human Events, “the international community never seems terribly exercised about the persecution of Christian minorities.

“The Western world is sometimes complacent about the inevitable triumph of pluralistic democracy, …read more

Source: OP-EDS

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