You are browsing the archive for 2013 September 25.

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Sen. Paul Discusses Obamacare and Sen. Cruz's Filibuster on CNN – 09/25/13

September 25, 2013 in Politics & Elections

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Source: RAND PAUL

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Sen. Rand Paul Appears on Your World with Neil Cavuto – September 25, 2013

September 25, 2013 in Politics & Elections

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Source: RAND PAUL

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Senate Floor: Sens. Rand Paul and Mitch McConnell Obamacare Colloquy – September 25, 2013

September 25, 2013 in Politics & Elections

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Source: RAND PAUL

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New In Our Store: Ron Paul’s New Book

September 25, 2013 in Economics

By Mises Updates

M670

Ron Paul’s new book, The School Revolution: A New Answer for Our Broken Education System, is now available in the Mises Store along side another recent edition: the Ron Paul poster.

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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David Gordon on the True Nature of Our Economic System

September 25, 2013 in Economics

By Mises Updates

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In his latest book review for Mises Daily, David Gordon reviews hunter Lewis’s new book on crony capitalism:

The result of this governmental takeover of the economy has predictably been dire. “Many of the new mega rich of the 1990s and 2000s got their wealth through their government connections. Or by understanding how government worked. This was especially apparent on Wall Street. … This was all the more regrettable because, in a crony capitalist system, the huge gains of the few really do come at the expense of the many. There was an irony here. Perhaps Marx had been right all along. It was just that he was describing a crony capitalist, not a free price system, and his most devoted followers set up a system in the Soviet Union that was cronyist to the core.” (p. 17)

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Spitznagel on Austrian Economics-Inspired Investing

September 25, 2013 in Economics

By Mises Updates

The New York Times online today profiles Mark Spitznagel, author of The Dao of Capital: Austrian Investing in a Distorted World:

Still, Mr. Spitznagel’s approach is unusual for a money manager. To invest with him, you have to believe in a philosophy that is grounded in the Austrian school of economics (which originated in the late 19th century in Vienna). The Austrian school does not like government to meddle with any part of the economy: when it does, adherents argue, market distortions abound, creating opportunities for investors who can see them.

When those distortions are present, Austrian-school investors will position themselves to wait out any artificial effect on the market, ready to take advantage when prices readjust.

In Mr. Spitznagel’s recently published book, “The Dao of Capital,” he applies this approach and his Austrian grounding to Chinese Daoist thought — the art of taking a circuitous path to an endpoint. Or, as Mr. Spitznagel says, “Learn to invest in loss.”

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Toronto Austrian Scholars Conference 2013

September 25, 2013 in Economics

By Peter G. Klein

Our colleagues at the Mises Institute of Canada — an independent organization working to promote Austrian economics in the Great White North — is holding its second Toronto Austrian Scholars Conference November 1-2, 2013. David Howden is giving the keynote, and Glenn Fox Predrag Rajsic, and George Bragues will also present.

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Senate Floor: Sen.Paul joins Sen. Cruz on Defunding Obamacare part 2- September 25, 2013

September 25, 2013 in Politics & Elections

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Source: RAND PAUL

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Too Many Students Denied Privacy Rights

September 25, 2013 in Economics

By Nat Hentoff

Nat Hentoff

There is a constant national debate on how well our schools are preparing kids for lives they’ll feel worth living. But the importance of that issue somewhat omits another major concern: how regularly these students are being tracked in and out of class.

I’d previously reported how Andrea Hernandez, a high school sophomore in the Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas, had been expelled for refusing to wear a Radio Frequency Identification Card (RFID) that records every step students take.

You see, she’d read our Constitution.

In a lawsuit filed on her behalf by lawyers from the Rutherford Institute, Andrea claimed that, according to the Book of Revelation, she couldn’t be forced by a ruling secular authority to reject her personal religious beliefs. This was at the core of her right to religious freedom.

And, I reported a few weeks ago, as a result of her acting in awareness of her identity as a free American, she was later expelled from school (my column, “Public School Students Being Tracked Continually,” Sept. 11).

Her attorneys (provided at no charge by Rutherford Institute leader John Whitehead) firmly reminded the Texas courts that her school had denied her of her rights under the Texas Religious Freedom Act and the Fourteenth Amendment, which guarantees all Americans equal protection under the laws.

These knowledgeable American citizens had finally so re-educated the Northside Independent School District that, lo and behold, on Aug. 26, Andrea resumed classes at the John Jay Science and Engineering Academy, which regards itself as a magnet school.

Andrea Hernandez and John Whitehead have indeed made it a magnet, drawing the attention of other school administrators who still treat their tracked students as possible future suspects in alleged violations of their schools’ code of conduct.

Not only is Andrea back in class, but under this barrage of judicial criticism, the Northside Independent School District has decided to stop using the RFID program, whose badges had tiny tracking chips that followed students everywhere on school property.

Also, school officials didn’t dig the unfavorable publicity from Andrea’s Rutherford lawsuit. See, argued John Whitehead, “change is possible if Americans care enough to take a stand and make their discontent heard.

“As Andrea Hernandez and her family showed,” he continued, “the best way to ensure that your government officials hear you is by never giving up, never backing down, and never remaining silent — even when things seem hopeless.”

And as I keep …read more

Source: OP-EDS

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Three Defunding Myths

September 25, 2013 in Economics

By Michael D. Tanner

Michael D. Tanner

In less than a week, the continuing resolution (CR) that is currently funding the government will expire, possibly precipitating what one and all refer to as a “government shutdown.” This term is usually uttered in terms that suggest an event falling in severity somewhere between Hurricane Katrina and the zombie apocalypse.

Unfortunately, much of the debate surrounding this question has been misleading, if not completely wrong. Among the most frequently repeated myths:

Republicans voted to shut down the government. House Republicans voted this week to fund the government through December. In fact, the CR that Republicans passed would actually increase federal spending by roughly $21 billion over current law. They did include a provision, or rider, prohibiting the use of any money for implementation of Obamacare, but that would have no effect on the rest of government. On the Senate side, one could argue that, if Senator Cruz is successful in his filibuster of the House CR, Republicans should be held responsible for the consequences. On the other hand, if Senate Democrats refuse to pass the House CR, they would be responsible for whatever followed. Regardless, the only bill on the table right now does not shut down the government.

A government shutdown shuts down the government. In reality more of the government is likely to stay open than to close. For example, government activities that have “some reasonable and articulable connection between the function to be performed and the safety of human life or the protection of property” will continue regardless of whether Congress passes a CR. This includes not only such obvious things as military operations and homeland security, but also air-traffic control, health care at Veterans Administration hospitals, law enforcement and criminal investigations, oversight of food and drug safety, nuclear safety, and so forth. In fact, much as we might wish it otherwise, even the IRS would continue to function under such a “shutdown.” Moreover, since entitlement programs, like Social Security and Medicare, are not subject to annual appropriations, they would also continue.

That is not to suggest that a government shutdown is a good thing or that there won’t be some pain involved. Government employees, including the military, won’t get paid on time — although even they will probably receive their pay retroactively once a CR is finally passed. Passport applications will go unprocessed; education and training programs will be suspended; parks and monuments will close; and vendors, including many small …read more

Source: OP-EDS