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Breitbart Op-Ed: Time to End Military's Sexual Assault Epidemic

November 8, 2013 in Politics & Elections

William Wilberforce once said, ‘Having heard all of this you may choose to look the other way, but you can never say again that you didn’t know.’[1] (Note to self: Don’t forget to footnote this).
Wilberforce was speaking of the unspeakable injustice of slavery, but I think his words could apply to any injustice.
I cannot look the other way after hearing the story of a young naval recruit from Georgetown, Ky. She was raised in a military family and upon graduating from high school she chose to proudly serve in the U.S. Navy.
While at training camp in 2008, she was attacked and raped by another recruit. The assailant beat her to a pulp, pinching three nerves in her spine and bruising her hips and legs to the point of immobility. She not only suffered from physical pain, but from emotional trauma as well. For years, she harbored suicidal thoughts and continued to suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.[2]
According to the Department of Defense, over 26,000 acts of unwanted sexual contact occurred in our military last year.[3] Of the 26,000, only 3,374-the equivalent of one in seven-of these incidents were reported to the authorities.[4] In contrast, over half of all rapes are reported in civilian world.[5]
This naval recruit reported her assault, however the photos of her injuries, evidence from the crime scene and rape kit were all ‘lost’ and the case was dismissed before the investigation even began.[6] Her assailant walks free today and still serves in the U.S. Navy on a base just three hours away from her home in Kentucky.[7]
To be a victim of sexual assault and to have your attacker walk free or be reprimanded with a mere slap on the wrist is a tragedy and an injustice that must be corrected.
This week, I joined Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) in a press conference to support her crusade to end sexual violence in the military.
In an arena filled with so many attacks and politics of personal destruction, it sometimes refreshing for representatives from the left and right to join forces for something good.
Some issues aren’t conservative or liberal– they are important issues of justice.
At the press conference, a young woman and former Marine told her story. I was horrified and saddened to hear how she was assaulted by two Marines who broke her door down to attack her.
A …read more

Source: RAND PAUL

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Republicans are Wising up on Immigration

November 8, 2013 in Economics

By Alex Nowrasteh

Alex Nowrasteh

American conservatives have always been of two minds about immigration. The first instinct extols the virtues and benefits of immigration — a process that makes America wealthier and more culturally prosperous, as well as being consistent with our old historical roots. The second is concerned that immigrants make America less American — less prosperous, less free, and less culturally familiar.

In line with the second instinct, Republicans are typically more opposed to immigration than Democrats are, but this is a recent phenomenon. In the 1980s, Republican President Ronald Reagan supported amnesty for unlawful immigrants and went further, famously stating in his farewell address that America was a city on a hill, “and if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and heart to get here.”

The sooner American conservatives shed the influence of anti-immigration groups wielding faux-conservative arguments, the sooner they’ll realize that immigration is a traditional source of prosperity.”

In the 1960s, it was the Democrats and their labour union allies who killed the last large scale guest worker visa program, to protect organized labour. In the early 20th century, labourunions, eugenicists and their left-wing supporters pushed for virtually ending immigration while the free-marketeers of the day wanted to keep the doors wide open. Beginning in the 1990s, something began to change in the conservative movement.

Anti-immigration organizations such as the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), and NumbersUSA infiltrated the conservative movement and convinced many that opposing immigration was the conservative American position.

Even odder, FAIR, CIS, and NumbersUSA were founded, funded, and mostly staffed by pro-population control environmentalists. They opposed immigration on the grounds it damages the natural environment to pull immigrants out of poverty and thus increase their environmental impact. Mario Lopez’s exposé, “Hijacking Immigration?” in the Human Life Review reveals how pro-population control environmentalists “whose work is ultimately diametrically opposed to the right to life”, a right so important to the conservative movement, gained so much influence.

Many conservatives resisted the anti-immigration campaign. Many, like Representatives Paul Ryan (R-WI), Raul Labrador (R-ID), and Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), support increasing legal immigration and legalising some current unauthorized immigrants. With those and other exceptions, conservatives are generally more skeptical of the benefits of immigration and frequently voice their concerns.

One concern is that immigrants will use and abuse …read more

Source: OP-EDS

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VIDEO: Mark Thornton Explains the Economics of NSA Surveillance

November 8, 2013 in Economics

By Mises Updates

Mark Thornton explains some unintended consequences of bulk NSA spying:

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Ron Paul on His School Revolution

November 8, 2013 in Economics

By Mises Updates

Interviewed in today’s Mises Daily, Ron Paul comments on education and strategy for the freedom movement:

We don’t need to convince everyone. Most people take no interest in the issues that drive you and me. We need to persuade a dedicated minority. We need to reach the intellectual leaders of tomorrow from our ranks. If even 5 percent of the American public were truly conversant with the great thinkers and classics of the freedom philosophy, it would be a very, very different situation.

Remember, too, that the transmission of news and information is becoming decentralized. One no longer has to be part of the media establishment in order to get a hearing and even a following. I am looking to train the coming generations of libertarians to take up this role. That way, we can have an influence out of proportion to our numbers.

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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LIVE VIDEO: “How Does An Economy Grow” Is Now Live

November 8, 2013 in Economics

By Mises Updates

mises4

Watch here:

Posted at 10:05 AM Central Time

UPDATE: 10:30 AM

This is both an online and a brick-and-mortar event: Mark Thornton Introduces the event this morning (from the Instagram page):

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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The Federal Reserve at 100

November 8, 2013 in Economics

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Federal Reserve. In this month’s Cato Unbound we debate what can we learn from 100 years of central banking. Cato scholar Gerald O’Driscoll calls the Fed’s record “unenviable,” and economist Lawrence H. White agrees. Scott Sumner suggests that while central banks may have their problems, inflation isn’t one of them anymore; Sumner recommends a flexible monetary policy that continues to use central banking to stabilize the economy in times of crisis.

…read more

Source: CATO HEADLINES

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Trade Deficit Oped in The New York Times Is Heavy on Fallacy and Wrong on Economics

November 8, 2013 in Economics

By Daniel J. Ikenson

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Daniel J. Ikenson

The New York Times published an oped yesterday by Jared Bernstein and Dean Baker, which presents a badly misinformed view of trade deficits, budget deficits, and the causes of economic growth. Nearly every paragraph in the piece relies on an assailable premise or discredited assertion. The essence of their argument is that the U.S. trade deficit is to blame for slow U.S. economic growth and that the solution is to reduce that deficit by deliberately crippling imports and promoting exports. Their premise is wrong and their recommendations are even worse.

Bernstein and Baker are from the “leakage” school of thought, which posits that resources spent on imports vanish into the ether without any positive benefits accruing to the U.S. economy. They write: “Running a trade deficit means that income generated in the United States is being spent elsewhere. In that situation, labor demand — jobs to produce imported goods — shifts from here to there.”

That is such an elementary fallacy to commit that only one of two conclusions can be drawn: (1) The authors are not qualified to write about the subject or (2) they are hoping to advance a narrow agenda.

A trade surplus is not the purpose of trade and trade measures are not legitimate objectives of policy.”

By purchasing more goods and services from foreigners than foreigners purchase from Americans — their argument goes — U.S. factories, farmers, and service providers are deprived of sales, which reduces domestic output, value added (GDP), and employment. But their argument relies on the assumption that the dollars sent to foreigners to purchase imports do not make their way back into the U.S. economy—an assumption that even undergraduate economics students know to be false.

The dollars that go abroad to purchase foreign goods and services (imports) and foreign assets (outward investment) are matched virtually identically by dollars coming back to the United States to purchase U.S. goods and services (exports) and U.S. assets (inward investment). Any trade deficit (net outflow of dollars) is matched by an investment surplus (net inflow of dollars). This process helps explain the absence of an inverse relationship between the trade deficit and jobs and between the trade deficit and domestic output, which is all that anyone needs to observe to appreciate how badly the Bernstein-Baker piece misses the mark.

As the chart below demonstrates, if anything, there is a positive relationship between the trade deficit and GDP. In years when the deficit is …read more

Source: OP-EDS