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How Probation Privateers Prey on the Poor

April 5, 2014 in Blogs

By Bill Berkowitz, The Smirking Chimp

Privately owned probation companies are routinely jailing probationers for not being able to pay fees.


Last April, in a column titled Debtors Prisons, Once a 19th-Century Relic, Again Wreaking Havoc in US, I wrote: “The jailing of people unable to pay fines and court costs is no longer a relic of the 19th century American judicial system. Debtors' prisons are alive and well in one-third of the states in this country.” Last week, I received a Press Release from the Ohio American Civil Liberties Union that appeared to strike a blow against this appalling phenomenon.

The release stated that “the Supreme Court of Ohio distributed a new 'bench card' to all of the state's judges, giving much needed instructions to avoid the unconstitutional practice of sending people to jail when they owe the court fines and are unable to pay. The Ohio Supreme Court's “bench card” was a definite blow to what had become the routine jailing in several states of people who were not able to pay fines imposed for a relatively minor crime committed.”

Now, however, a new report by Human Rights Watch has revealed another way that poor people are being unduly financially burdened and, in many cases, imprisoned for not having enough money to pay their court-imposed fines. According to Profiting from Probation: America's 'Offender-Funded' Probation Industry, privately owned companies handling the probation of offenders are “routinely jailing probationers” for not being able to pay fees owed to those companies.

Private companies are Profiting from Probation

“Every year, US courts sentence several hundred thousand people to probation and place them under the supervision of for-profit companies for months or years at a time,” Profiting from Probation points out. “They then require probationers to pay these companies for their services. Many of these offenders are only guilty of minor traffic violations like speeding or driving without proof of insurance. Others have shoplifted, been cited for public drunkenness, or committed other misdemeanor crimes. Many of these offenses carry no real threat of jail time in and of themselves, yet each month, courts issue thousands of arrest warrants for offenders …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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