You are browsing the archive for 2014 September 15.

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When Motherhood Isn't Wonderful

September 15, 2014 in Blogs

By Charlotte Hsu, Salon.com

I missed the life my husband and I had, and the more I heard about the joy of being a mom, the worse I felt.

The old man in the wheelchair looked over, his eyes meeting mine from below the brim of his Buffalo Sabres cap.

I apologized for the infant squirming in my lap. It was mid-April, and Max, our baby boy, had wailed the entire way from the newborn ward of Sisters Hospital to the building’s main entrance. Now, as we waited for our ride by the facility’s revolving doors, Max continued to scream. But the old man wasn’t upset.

“A new life,” he told me in a quiet rasp, a smile behind his eyes.

I turned my head so he wouldn’t see the tears.

*

Growing up, I never wanted to be a mother. Until we had Max, I wasn’t sure how I would find the experience of being a parent.

Now, I know.

My heart broke when he struggled with the simplest things — when he couldn’t get milk flowing into his little mouth, or when he got the hiccups and couldn’t stop them and didn’t know what they were.

Sometimes, late at night, I would watch him, imagining how scared he must be. He would squeak and gurgle in his sleep. He often gasped. They say that infants have something called the Moro reflex, where they wave their arms because they feel as if they’re falling.

I loved our baby more than I ever could have predicted.

As time went on, though, I found that I did not like being a mother.

Everyone says, “Congratulations,” but no one tells you how hard it will be.

I often felt that having a kid was the worst decision I ever made. When one friend kept asking, “But it’s a wonderful time, too, isn’t it?” I kept replying, “No.”

There is an episode in “Battlestar Galactica” where humans being hunted by Cylons find that the pursuers are able to pinpoint the people’s location every 33 minutes. So every 33 minutes, the humans “jump” their convoy of ships to new coordinates in space, then reset …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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‘Power and Market’ Is Now in Persian

September 15, 2014 in Economics

By Ryan McMaken

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Thanks to translator Matin Pedram, Rothbard’s Power and Market is now available in a Persian translation.

Front:

Back:

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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The Mises Institute Hosts Auburn Econ Graduate Students

September 15, 2014 in Economics

By Ryan McMaken

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As has been done for several years, the Mises Institute hosted our annual Auburn University Economics Graduate Student Reception on Friday at our campus next to Auburn University. It was organized by Jonathan Newman (Summer Fellow 2014, Mises U Alum, and Economics Doctoral Student at Auburn).

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Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Sen. Rand Paul Appears on CBS This Morning with Charlie Rose & Gayle King – September 15, 2014

September 15, 2014 in Politics & Elections

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Source: RAND PAUL

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Sen. Rand Paul Appears on Fox's America's Newsroom with Martha MacCallum – September 15, 2014

September 15, 2014 in Politics & Elections

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Source: RAND PAUL

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Shocking Photoshopped Viral Image Makes Point that NFL's Goodell Must Go

September 15, 2014 in Blogs

By Janet Allon, AlterNet

Covergirl ad is used to make the strongest point about domestic abuse, the NFL and make-up.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell may have reportedly gone into hiding, but there is nowhere to hide from the angry backlash against the NFL's handling of the Ray Rice domestic abuse scandal. Now, with law enforcement sources essentially saying Goodell lied about the fact that he did not have the opportunity to view the video of Rice knocking his fiancee out in the Atlantic City elevator until recently, the calls for his resignation or firing are becoming louder.

Part of the pressure comes from UltraViolet, a women’s advocacy group that flew banners that say #GoodellMustGo over some stadiums during Sunday’s games.
 
An image posted Twitter under the #GoodellMustGo hashtag made the point with devastating clarity. It is a photoshopped version of a one of Covergirl's GameFace ads, a beautifully made-up woman with a black eye that no amount of make-up can cover. Covergirl is the official beauty sponsor of the NFL, which now brings up the unfortunate irony that make-up is often used to cover up the injuries and bruises domestic abuse victims suffer.
 
The clever image was originated by journalist and feminist Adelle Stan, (formerly of AlterNet), and it has since been further photoshopped and gone viral. While some have seen the image as offensive, most of the reaction has suggested that it is precisely the kind of shocking image needed to make the point about the ugliness of domestic violence, Goodell's duplicity and the fact that Covergirl should suspend its NFL campaign.
 
UltraViolet is also circulating a petition for Goodell’s resignation. 
 
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Source: ALTERNET

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Climate Change and the False Case for Haste

September 15, 2014 in Economics

By Ross McKitrick

Ross McKitrick

When President Barack Obama addresses the United Nations Climate Summit on Sept. 23, you can bet that he will be calling for immediate, substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. But is the time for action now?

The White House has claimed that the cost of delaying action on climate change would be greater than if actions were undertaken now. Therefore, the U.S. should move quickly to enact regulatory measures to reduce greenhouse gases. But there is a fatal flaw in the reasoning: the climate issue does not fit the framework in which an early start implies lower costs.

That framework requires three basic conditions to be met. First, we need to know with a high degree of certainty what the optimal policy target is and when it needs to be reached. Second, we need to be sure that no influential new information will be arriving in the near future that might affect our view on an optimal policy target. Third, we need to have an accurate picture of the range of risks associated with acting or not acting.

The arguments for hasty action on greenhouse gases do not hold up.”

Firstly, defining the optimal policy regarding greenhouse gas emissions has eluded governments for over 20 years. If there is going to be any policy response, it only makes sense at a global level, but global cooperation is unlikely. Even if it could be achieved, the more fundamental problem is that carbon dioxide, or CO2 (the greenhouse gas targeted under climate policy), is very difficult and expensive to reduce in quantities that matter for climate.

Unlike soot and particulate matter (better known as carbon pollution) there are no scrubbers to capture CO2 and nowhere to put it once it is captured. Reducing CO2 emissions pretty much requires cutting fossil fuel use, which is very expensive in an industrial economy. And at the scale of the global climate, only massive global reductions are large enough to have a measurable effect on climate. But only tiny reductions are affordable.

In other words, affordable measures are ineffective, and effective measures are unaffordable. Anyone picking a target and timetable for CO2 reductions (such as 20 percent by 2020) is, therefore, simply making an arbitrary guess.

The second question relates to the first. What might be the benefits of a 20 percent CO2 cut? To answer, we have to agree on the economic harm associated with the …read more

Source: OP-EDS

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Robert Reich Calls Out Harvard Business School for Its Role in Widening Inequality

September 15, 2014 in Blogs

By Robert Reich, Robert Reich's Blog

The top educator of American CEOs needs to rethink what it is teaching.

No institution is more responsible for educating the CEOs of American corporations than Harvard Business School – inculcating in them a set of ideas and principles that have resulted in a pay gap between CEOs and ordinary workers that’s gone from 20-to-1 fifty years ago to almost 300-to-1 today.

survey, released on September 6, of 1,947 Harvard Business School alumni showed them far more hopeful about the future competitiveness of American firms than about the future of American workers.

As the authors of the survey conclude, such a divergence is unsustainable. Without a large and growing middle class, Americans won’t have the purchasing power to keep U.S. corporations profitable, and global demand won’t fill the gap. Moreover, the widening gap eventually will lead to political and social instability. As the authors put it, “any leader with a long view understands that business has a profound stake in the prosperity of the average American.”

Unfortunately, the authors neglected to include a discussion about how Harvard Business School should change what it teaches future CEOs with regard to this “profound stake.” HBS has made some changes over the years in response to earlier crises, but has not gone nearly far enough with courses that critically examine the goals of the modern corporation and the role that top executives play in achieving them.

A half-century ago, CEOs typically managed companies for the benefit of all their stakeholders – not just shareholders, but also their employees, communities, and the nation as a whole.

“The job of management,” proclaimed Frank Abrams, chairman of Standard Oil of New Jersey, in a 1951 address, “is to maintain an equitable and working balance among the claims of the various directly affected interest groups … stockholders, employees, customers, and the public at large. Business managers are gaining professional status partly because they see in their work the basic responsibilities [to the public] that other professional men have long recognized as theirs.” 

This view was a common view among chief executives of the time. Fortune magazine urged CEOs to become “industrial …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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Winning Issues That Aren’t Just about 'Not Obama'

September 15, 2014 in Economics

By Richard W. Rahn

Richard W. Rahn

If you were a campaign manager for Republicans running for the Senate or House in November, what policy positions would you advise them to take? The Republican Party has been under a lot of criticism for running a campaign of “not Obama” rather than presenting a positive agenda — and much of this criticism is valid. That being said, it is far easier for those of us who are with policy organizations to give advice about what a candidate ought to say — because we don’t take the direct hit if our policy ideas don’t resonate with a majority of voters. As a result, too many candidates resort to the banal — “I am in favor of a strong national defense, lower government spending, and tax reform.”

Countries with parliamentary political systems typically have many issue-driven parties, and the trick to forming a government is to build a coalition of these parties to obtain a governing majority in parliament. The U.S. system requires that one of the two parties builds an internal coalition of interests to obtain 51 percent (or more) of the vote. Years ago, I occasionally advised political candidates from the congressional to the presidential level, and so I have some understanding of why candidates are less policy-pure and specific than we would like them to be.

For instance, as an economist with expertise in tax policy, I am in favor of abolishing the corporate-income tax for many good reasons — but unfortunately, we have yet to persuade a majority of the voters. If I were advising a Republican candidate in a marginal district, I might well tell him to advocate a “reduction in the corporate-income tax to 20 percent, so it is internationally competitive.” It should be easy to explain that the United States, having the highest corporate-income tax in the world, is driving investment, innovation and jobs out of the country. Thus, the position would seem sensible to most people — and would be a good, but incomplete, step forward.

Positive messages about spending reduction and tax reform will resonate with voters.”

Asset forfeiture — that is, the seizing of assets from totally innocent citizens, without being convicted of anything — by federal, state and local law enforcement officials, including the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), is an issue that rightly appalls most Americans. I have been writing about it for 15 years, but only recently, …read more

Source: OP-EDS

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Opening the Skies: Put Free Trade in Airline Services on the Transatlantic Trade Agenda

September 15, 2014 in Economics

The EU and the United States began negotiations for a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) in 2013, with the primary goals of reducing impediments to cross-border trade and investment and achieving greater economic integration between the two areas. Curiously, there has been a near absence of discussion in the TTIP negotiations of freeing trade and investment in commercial airline services. In a new study, transportation policy expert Kenneth J. Button argues that the objections to liberalization lack genuine merit, offers insights into how U.S. airline passengers and businesses would benefit from opening the domestic air market to competition, and urges the U.S. and EU governments to put free trade in commercial air services on the TTIP negotiating agenda.

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Source: CATO HEADLINES