You are browsing the archive for 2014 October 27.

Avatar of admin

by admin

The Great Deformation Is Now in Polish

October 27, 2014 in Economics

By Ryan McMaken

299486-352x500

David Stockman’s huge volume on the background of the 2008 financial crisis, and on the role of the fed and government bailouts in the continuing crisis, is now available in Polish.

The Polish edition, Wielka deformacja, czyli jak skorumpowano amerykański kapitalizm, appears to be available for purchase at Amazon.fr. It’s also available directly from the publisher.

We’ve covered the English version of the book extensively here at Mises.org. Here is a Q and A with David Stockman about it, and Stockman’s author page features several selections from the book.

Robert Wenzel has posted the introduction from the new book (in English.)

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

Avatar of admin

by admin

Be Sure to Tune In for Mises Circle November 8

October 27, 2014 in Economics

By Ryan McMaken

Istock_0000

The West Coast Regional Mises Circle in Costa Mesa is sold out, but be sure and mark your calendars so you can join us live via Mises.org. On November 8 —one week from Saturday— we’ll be broadcasting all the lectures and speeches from Costa Mesa. I’ll provide you exact links as the event draws nearer.

Here’s the schedule:

Tentative Schedule (all times Pacific)
Grand Ballroom

10:20 a.m. Welcome
10:30 a.m. Jeff Deist “The Case for Optimism”
10:50 a.m. David Gordon “Thinkers Who Challenged the State”
11:10 a.m. Lew Rockwell “Against the State”
11:30 a.m. Presentation of the 2014 Mises Entrepreneurship Award to Louis E. Carabini
11:40 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch and discussion, bookstore open
1:00 p.m. Judge Andrew P. Napolitano “The Natural Law as a Restraint Against Tyranny”
1:30 p.m. Ron Paul “Freedom Doesn’t Come from Government”
2:00 p.m. break, bookstore open (final opportunity to purchase books for speakers to autograph)
2:20 p.m. Speaker Panel Q&A
3:00 p.m. Closing remarks
3:10 p.m. Adjourn

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

Avatar of admin

by admin

The Government Is Denying Due Process to Thousands of Detained Asylum Seekers

October 27, 2014 in Economics

By Alex Nowrasteh

Alex Nowrasteh

Critics of President Obama’s immigration policies describe them as violating the rule of law. According to Representative Steve King (R-IA), “Immigration enforcement has been under attack since our current president was sworn in, despite his constitutional oath requiring him to ‘take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed.’”

Ironically, these critics ignore one of the most egregious offenses to the rule of law on this issue: the systematic denial of due process in immigrant detention centers across the country.

This summer saw a large increase in unaccompanied child migrants coming over the border. But that surge masked an even larger boost in the number of families fleeing violence — a 412 percent increase in the last fiscal year.

Due process is a vital component of the rule of law and one that is being systematically denied to women and children fleeing violence.”

These families are overwhelmingly mothers with children. Many claim to be fleeing domestic or gang violence and would face reprisals if they were returned to their home countries. Under American asylum law, if the parent of these families claims she was violently abused and the police in her country either did not want to protect her or were incapable of doing so, then she could be granted asylum.

Rather than ensuring these families can access a fair process to adjudicate their claims under the law, the Obama administration has stripped away many of their due process protections.

The government is detaining these families in an expanding system of family detention centers. In June of this year, there were just 90 beds set aside for families in detention centers. Since then, about 1,200 beds have been added and the government has approved another detention center in Dilley, Texas, with 2,400 beds. When the Dilley detention center is complete, the number of beds for families will have increased to almost 4000 in just a few months.

Interestingly, the federal government is not consulting with the local government of Dilley to build this facility. Last month the feds tacked on an addendum in a contract with a county in Arizona that subcontracts with a private prison firm that would allow for the detention facility to be built in Dilley. The County Commissioner in Dilley, Texasdescribed the process as, “[The feds] come in here and tell us, ‘We want your input on this and that,’ but the bottom line is they’ll do it …read more

Source: OP-EDS

Avatar of admin

by admin

The Many Ways the State Taxes the Poor

October 27, 2014 in Economics

By Ryan McMaken

6938

Mises Daily Monday by Julian Adorney:

Contrary to the political myth, poor people do indeed pay taxes, and they pay into a system that robs them of control over how they can spend, save, or invest their own property. In addition, the poor are taxed by a perverse incentive structure that punishes their financial success

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

Avatar of admin

by admin

Why People Trade

October 27, 2014 in Economics

By Ryan McMaken

1421163_10152517945798935_4979687098529242252_o (1)

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

Avatar of admin

by admin

Make America Safer: Shut Down the Department of Homeland Security

October 27, 2014 in Economics

By Chris Edwards

Chris Edwards

Congress created the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2002 by combining 22 agencies that are responsible for a vast array of activities. President George W. Bush promised that the new department would “improve efficiency without growing government” and would cut out “duplicative and redundant activities that drain critical homeland security resources.”

The president’s promise of creating a lean and efficient DHS did not materialize. The department’s spending doubled from $27 billion in 2004 to $54 billion in 2014. Its workforce expanded from 163,000 employees in 2004 to 190,000 by 2014. And far from being efficient, DHS agencies are some of the most poorly managed in the federal government.

DHS houses the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Transportation Security Administration (TSA), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Secret Service, and many other agencies. These agencies are known more for scandals than for high performance, and burying them within the DHS bureaucratic superstructure did not help matters.

DHS illustrates a fundamental problem with the federal government: it tries to do far too much, and ends up doing little well.”

This article explores three types of DHS failing: general mismanagement, misallocated investment, and civil liberties abuse. It argues that DHS should be closed down. Needed DHS agencies should be moved to other departments or should report directly to the president. Other DHS agencies, including FEMA and TSA, should be terminated because their services would be better provided by the states and private sector.

General Mismanagement

DHS has suffered from management failures since the beginning. It has long been on the Government Accountability Office (GAO)’s “high risk” list of troubled federal organizations. Employee surveys by the Partnership for Public Service have found that DHS is the worst department to work for in the government.

In October, The Washington Post reviewed a new survey of 40,000 DHS employees, and it found grim results. Only 42 percent of DHS employees said they are satisfied with the department, only 25 percent have a positive view of their leaders’ ability to “generate high levels of motivation and commitment in the workforce,” and only 39 percent said department leaders  “maintain high standards of honesty and integrity.”

In September, a separate Washington Post investigation found that many DHS employees say they have “a dysfunctional work environment” with “abysmal morale.” Not surprisingly, DHS has a high employee turnover rate. Current and former DHS officials told the Post that “the department can be …read more

Source: OP-EDS

Avatar of admin

by admin

Either Liberty Or the IRS

October 27, 2014 in Economics

By Richard W. Rahn

Richard W. Rahn

After last week’s ruling wherein a federal court failed to permanently bar the Internal Revenue Service from targeting conservative groups, there can be no doubt that liberty and the IRS are incompatible. The IRS continues to seize bank accounts of individuals and businesses without a court determination of wrongdoing. The IRS is supporting the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) initiative to the automatic exchange of individual and business financial account information in tax matters between governments. The IRS code is now so complex — something like 77,000 pages no one can understand — that everyone is at risk.

Officials of the Obama administration and the IRS have demonstrated time and time again that they are willing to misuse their powers for partisan political purposes. Now, in essence, the court has said it is OK, provided they promise not to do it again. If there are no consequences for bad behavior, one would be naive to believe it will not be repeated.

Congress has the power to correct the above-mentioned abuses. If Democrats continue to hold one or both houses of Congress, it is almost a certainty that no real reform will occur, because it is not in their political interest to do so. The Republicans could and should make the necessary reforms, but even if they control both houses of Congress, they may be too timid to do so. Still, there is at least a chance they will do the right thing.

Only Congress can save Americans from tax agency abuse.”

What is a voter to do — if one wants to try to preserve what remains of liberty? One who votes for almost any Democrat for Congress is likely voting for continuing and perhaps expanding the IRS offenses — so those who value economic liberty have no choice but to vote against the Democrat.

Congress needs to pass legislation that gives the right to taxpayers to hold individuals within the IRS accountable for political targeting or other improper uses of power. That is, IRS employees must have their sovereign immunity protections taken away from them. The potential problems an IRS employee might have with the loss of such protection is of far less danger to the republic than the danger that politically corrupted, irresponsible and renegade IRS employees pose to the public. IRS employees should be no more protected than are people in the private sector who misbehave. Also, every IRS communication to any taxpayer should be signed by the individual in the IRS who is specifically responsible for the content and accuracy of the communication — no more anonymous …read more

Source: OP-EDS