You are browsing the archive for 2014 November 15.

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This Week in Religion: How Faith Healing Can Lead to Manslaughter

November 15, 2014 in Blogs

By Dan Arel, AlterNet

A couple from from the Church of the First Born withheld medical care from their 12-year-old daughter, who later died from diabetes. Also, Glenn Beck's bogus illness.


This week is a sobering reminder of the dangers of fanatical religious beliefs. Travis and Wenona Rossiter were convicted of manslaughter this week in the death of their 12-year-old daughter whose diabetes was left untreated. The Rossiters, who belong to the Church of the First Born, believe in faith-based healing over the use of modern medicine.

According to KEZI News,

The couple is accused of recklessly and negligently causing the death of their 12-year-old daughter Syble last year, who died from diabetic ketoacidosis. The state argues the parents should have been aware of the girl’s health problems, and that a reasonable person would have sought medical care.

Faith-based healing has spent a lot of time in the news over the last few years and has resulted in the death of countless children from preventable ailments. Many states in the US are starting to act and requiring by law any child under the age of 18 be treated by a medical professional. One can only hope the rest follow suit.

This week also saw former Fox News host and owner of The Blaze, Glenn Beck, a radical Christian Right conspiracy news organization; announce that he had been suffering from a neurological disorder. Beck claimed to have had “adrenal fatigue” but had undergone treatment that involved spiritual work and lots of prayer and announced he had been cured.

Well it turns out Beck’s claim was rather fictitious as it was never diagnosed by a medical professional. His treatment was administered by Dr. Ted Carrick, a chiropractic neurologist, which is a field not recognized by medical professionals. According to Dr. Steven Novella of Yale University, the profession is nothing but “pure pseudoscience,”

“Chiropractic neurology does not appear to be based on any body of research, or any accumulated scientific knowledge,” Novella wrote on his blog. “I am not aware of any research that establishes their core claims. A search on PubMed for ‘Carrick T’ yielded …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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“Welcome to Christie’s”

November 15, 2014 in Economics

By Mark Thornton

Con Temporary Art Auction Record–Sheep line up to be fleeced

Inflation revealed its ugly head again in New York City–where the money is.

Christie’s set another record contemporary art auction record of $852.9 million exceeding both the high estimate for the auction and also the recent record it set in May of this year.

How many do you have in your collection?

The sale saw new artist records for 11 artists, among them Cy Twombly, Ed Ruscha, Peter Doig, Martin Kippenberger, Sturtevant, and Seth Price. Seventy-five of the eighty lots on offer found buyers, for an impressive sell-through rate by lot of 94 percent.

Suckers a plenty:

But the evening was primarily made up of people buying for themselves, Brett Gorvy, Christie’s chairman and international head of postwar and contemporary art, said at the press conference after the sale, emphasizing the some 500 bidders from 43 different countries. He said that the new buyers were facilitated by recent “outreach” efforts in Shanghai, Hong Kong, and the Middle East.

“This was a collecting-buying pool tonight, rather than dealers,” he said.

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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The Grim Centennial of Stalemate

November 15, 2014 in Economics

By Hunt Tooley

A surprising range of news and opinion outlets have memorialized a string of anniversaries related to the Great War over the last few months: the assassination of the Archduke, the July Crisis, the start of the war, etc. Newspapers, magazines, the blog world, the top ten list sites, and Youtube channels have all feature anniversary observations.

We have now arrived at another grim centennial, but one which may not be as obvious as the murders in Sarajevo. At this moment a hundred years ago, one of the less distinct but nonetheless crucially important “events” of the First World War took shape: the end of the “war of movement” and the formation of stalemate on the Western Front.

[To read more, see the whole post at my blog on World War I]

…read more

Source: MISES INSTITUTE

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Capturing a Stranger’s Sneer: What Happened When I Put On Spandex

November 15, 2014 in Blogs

By Haley Morris-Cafiero, Salon

People told me to lose weight and clean up. So I tried self-improvement—and photographed the critical responses


I remember when I found the idea for the new images in my “Wait Watchers” series. I was in a sports equipment store with my husband, who was buying new running shoes.  While I waited, I walked around the store. A pair of pink, shiny running shorts caught my eye.  I walked to the rack, picked up the hanger holding the shorts in front of my face and stared at the shiny fabric. 

“Yeah, right,” I heard someone say.

I looked up to see a young female employee smirking at me and moving her eyes up and down my body.  She then turned and walked away.

My first thought was to tell the manager what happened.  My second thought was to demand that my husband not patronize the store. But my third thought was the best:  I can take photographs.  And a new idea was born.

For the past few years, I’ve been developing a series I call “Wait Watchers.” I set up my camera as I travel through a city, capturing strangers’ reactions to me as I wear my everyday clothes and do everyday things. Last year, I ran some of these photos in a story on Salon, and in reading the voluminous response online, I noticed many of the commenters did not criticize the photographs, but the way my face, body and clothing look.

Here’s one: “Men: Arm the harpoons!”

Or another: “Fat lump of lard. Stay off the donuts and go runnings. Makes me ill just looking at her.”

Since so many people suggested the world would be better if I lost weight and got a makeover — I decided to put myself in a world where I was not comfortable:  shopping malls, exercise trails and beauty counters.  My goal was to show that even when I am happily engaging in how society wants me to behave in order to fit their standard, I am still surrounded by what can be considered a …read more

Source: ALTERNET