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U.S. Libertarian Party Condemns Cuba’s Incarceration of Libertarians

April 7, 2017 in Blogs

By Zach Foster


Ubaldo Herrera Hernandez and Manuel Velazquez Visea have lit some huge brush fires of liberty in the short time since their arrest by State Security and incarceration in the Cuban Gulag. After 10 Libertarian state parties in the United States, as well as the Libertarian parties of Spain and Russia, condemned the action and called for the release of Herrera and Velazquez, the U.S. (national) Libertarian Party published the following:

The Libertarian National Committee of the United States condemns the arrest and detention of political dissidents Ubaldo Herrera Hernandez and Manuel Velazquez, who have been detained by the Cuban government since their arrest on February 2.

Both men were targeted for peacefully promoting small government, civil liberties, and free markets, for which they occasionally distributed flyers and put up posters.

Hernandez and Velazquez are members of Mises Cuba, an independent think tank which is based on the Ludwig von Mises Institute of Auburn, Alabama.

Mises Cuba has confirmed the activists’ ongoing detention.

“Hernandez and Velazquez are political prisoners whose actions have harmed no one and damaged no property,” said Nicholas Sarwark, Chair of the Libertarian National Committee. “We stand in solidarity with our fellow freedom fighters in Cuba.”

The Libertarian National Committee passed a resolution asserting that the activists’ arrest and detention “illustrate the threats to freedom we all face around the world.”

It further states:
“The Libertarian Party calls on the Cuban government to immediately release details of the above-mentioned arrests and detentions, including the specific charges being levied against the individuals in question. In the absence of such information, we call for the release of these prisoners.

“Libertarian activism worldwide must not be deterred by the attempts of authoritarian leaders, totalitarian governments, and dictatorial regimes to silence the voice of freedom. We condemn any acts of official oppression, and uphold the promotion of limited government and free markets in any country. Furthermore, we call on the U.S. Department of State to publicly denounce violations of the right to free speech, the right to peaceably assemble, and the right to due process abroad.”

For more information about this story:

Report: Arrested Mises Cuba Member Charged with “Distributing Enemy Propaganda”

Cuban libertarian activists sent to the gulag

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The Libertarian …read more

Source: ZACH FOSTER RANTS

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The Armed Libertarian Revolution in Mexico (Part 3)

April 7, 2017 in Blogs

By Zach Foster

Part 3: Villa, Zapata, and the citizen-soldiers

Francisco “Pancho” Villa (center), Commander, Northern Division
From 1910 to 1919, Emiliano Zapata led the Liberation Army of the South and is responsible for Morelos’ period of autonomy until his murder under a false flag of truce. Like Ethan Allen’s Green Mountain Boys, and also like the irregulars at Concord and Boston, the Zapatistas fought a prolonged guerrilla war with the popular support of the public throughout Morelos and in parts of Puebla and Mexico State. Like the Green Mountain Boys in the New Hampshire land grants, like the American Sagebrush Rebellion, like the militants at the Bundy Ranch standoff and the Oregon wildlife refuge standoff, and like the Zapatista rebels in Chiapas today, the government called the original Zapatistas criminals and terrorists when they took up arms to resist eminent domain.
Pancho Villa is a controversial figure in the Mexican Revolution. People from Northern Mexico still revere him as a man of the people, while the descendants of his enemies still revile him as a gangster. The truth is that he was somewhere in between the two. Testimonies of Villista veterans and civilians testifies that the Northern Division really did often provide food and badly needed public services to the civilian population. In this sense, the exploited population were less exploited under the revolutionaries than they were by the federal and loyalist state governments. However, Villa did have the ability to be brutal and have people executed at the drop of a hat. Part of the brutality known among Villa and his lieutenants comes from having been gangsters.
Villa never particularly wanted to be a gangster, but it came out of necessity. His career as an outlaw began in his teenage years when he had to flee his native Durango after killing the local boss. The feudal lord was in the process of sexually assaulting Villa’s sister when the boy intervened and killed the man. Modern courts would recognize this as a justifiable homicide, and the rape of a maiden was certainly a crime in a conservative Catholic country. Unfortunately, in those days, peasants had no rights in court. Doroteo Arango, …read more

Source: ZACH FOSTER RANTS