Avatar of admin

by

Watching The Crown? Here Are the Real Facts You Need to Know

December 20, 2017 in History

By Brynn Holland

Prime Minister Anthony Eden (on the left, depicted by Jeremy Northam in The Crown) shown during the aftermath of the Suez Crisis. (Credit: Alex Bailey/Netflix & Haywood Magee/Getty Images)

Netflix’s hit TV series The Crown, which goes deep inside the private world of Queen Elizabeth II and Britain’s royal family, chronicles their lives within the sweep of global events during and after World War II—from the Suez Crisis to John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Below, our guide to the history behind some of the show’s biggest season-two plotlines.

SPOILER ALERT: Major season two spoilers ahead. Read with care.

Prime Minister Anthony Eden (on the left, depicted by Jeremy Northam in The Crown) shown during the aftermath of the Suez Crisis. (Credit: Alex Bailey/Netflix & Haywood Magee/Getty Images)

THE SUEZ CRISIS
(Episode 1: Misadventure & Episode 2: A Company of Men)

On October 29, 1956, Israeli armed forces pushed into Egypt toward the Suez Canal three months after Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalized the canal to help fund a dam across the Nile River, initiating the Suez Crisis.

Nasser’s move dealt a harsh blow to the British. The 120-mile canal, a commercial shipping hub connecting the Mediterranean and Red Seas, was crucial to English economic interests, particularly since it facilitated the all-important flow of oil. Originally opened in 1869, it had been jointly controlled by Britain and France—even after Egypt gained independence in 1922. The British were loathe to lose it, and the international influence it signaled.

While it initially appeared that French and British forces joined the Israelis two days after their incursion, it was later revealed that the three powers had met and planned the attack altogether. This crisis put a significant strain on the relationship between these three countries and the United States. President Dwight D. Eisenhower was upset with the British, in particular, for not keeping the U.S. informed about their intentions. The U.S. threatened all three nations with economic sanctions if they persisted in their attack, and the United Nations passed a resolution calling for a cease-fire. The threats worked. The British and French forces withdrew by December; with Israel finally bowing to U.S. pressure in March 1957.

This crisis was not only seen as a complete failure, one that weakened the influence of Britain and France worldwide, but it was also a turning point in the career of Conservative Prime Minister Anthony Eden, who resigned two months later. While his official reason was “ill health,” it has long been assumed the worldwide …read more

Source: HISTORY

Leave a reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.