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You Too Can Live in a Knights Templar Castle

December 21, 2017 in History

By Carrie Coolidge

Château in Southern Charente, Angouleme.  ASKING PRICE: €1.54 million ($1.82 million). TEMPLAR CONNECTION: Built by the order during the 13th century as a commanderie, or estate under the control of a commander of a military order.  SELLING POINTS NOW: Small hilltop village location, 9 bedrooms, an architectural blend of Roman and Renaissance styles, a scullery, and a church and refectory on the property. (Photo courtesy of Maxwell-Baynes)

The Knights Templar may have been monastic warriors known as the “Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ,” but you probably wouldn’t know it from the real estate they left behind. The imposing manor houses, castles and fortresses they constructed in the 12th and 13th centuries could host crusading kings one week and withstand enemy bombardment the next.

The Templars built scores of impressive piles all over Europe and the near East, with clusters especially in France, Spain, Italy and Portugal. Given the profusion of myth and legend swirling around the order, it’s not surprising that the structures still intact today can come with titillating extras—think titles, ghosts and hidden treasure.

Château in Southern Charente, Angouleme. ASKING PRICE: €1.54 million ($1.82 million). TEMPLAR CONNECTION: Built by the order during the 13th century as a commanderie, or estate under the control of a commander of a military order. SELLING POINTS NOW: Small hilltop village location, 9 bedrooms, an architectural blend of Roman and Renaissance styles, a scullery, and a church and refectory on the property. (Photo courtesy of Maxwell-Baynes)

“Knights Templar were unusual people: cosmopolitan, driven and often aggressive in nature,” says Richard Hodges, archaeologist and President of the American University of Rome. “Imagine the ghosts such a property might have.”

Only a handful of Templar-related properties are available for purchase at any given time, and the vast majority of surviving châteaux on the market were built after the Renaissance, says Simon Oliver of Gites à la Française, which sells châteaux throughout France. “To find a château dating back to the 11th or 12th century on the market is rare. To find one in good condition is very rare. And to find a Knights Templar château in good condition is extremely rare,” he says.


Château de Douzens, in the Corbières wine region. ASKING PRICE: €890,000 ($1.05 million). TEMPLAR TOUCHES: Donated to the Templars in 1133, it includes secret rooms, hidden passages and possible ghosts. SELLING POINTS NOW: Dominating a small village in the Corbières wine region near Carcassonne, this 900-year-old château has four corner towers, nine bedrooms, a spa room and a swimming pool. (Photo courtesy of GITES a la Française)

One Templar-connected property, known as Château de Douzens, comes with the prospect of several medieval-era bonuses. On the market for €890,000 ($1.05 million), the 12th-century property, located in the Corbières wine region …read more

Source: HISTORY

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