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Here's What Happened When I Tried to Rescue Piglets From a Factory Farm

January 6, 2018 in Blogs

By Jenny McQueen, AlterNet

One piglet is now safe at a sanctuary, but we had to leave the rest behind in pig purgatory.


For a city girl, I've had a lot of experience with pigs. I've visited with them in sanctuaries, given belly rubs (they love those), introduced little children to them, rescued and cared for young piglets, witnessed distressed, overheated, freezing, and/or thirsty young pigs in slaughter trucks, and experienced the hellish conditions inside a pig breeding and pig growing facility.

Reading about the injustices meted out to food animals turned me into a vegan and then an animal rights activist. This was the 1990s, before I’d even met any farmed animals.

So what's the truth about how pigs live on farms?

The industry provides an adorable illustration of “This Little Piggy” in a sweet-looking children’s booklet, “Pig Tales Fun Book.” It shows piglets suckling from their mama on the grass, a vet on hand, kids playing among the pigs. The pigs are enjoying their freedom in an idyllic setting. It's an artistic rendering that the kids can color. What fun.

The reality, however, is quite different. This is from my direct experience, in Canada, a developed country.

From the outside, there are neat buildings, a clean white shed, surrounded by pristine fields. Workers park their cars and leave civilization to enter a secret world of suffering and injustice to their charges—hundreds, perhaps thousands of pigs. Their offices and kitchen area look like any workplace. Open the door to the pigs’ area and your senses and emotions are assaulted.

Pigs have sensitive noses. Their cousin, the truffle hog, is prized for sniffing out precious truffles. But pigs enduring life inside an industrial farm are in absolute purgatory. Shine a flashlight into the air and it's thick with particles. I wore silver jewelry and it was tarnished just from being exposed for a few hours. The cacophony of hundreds of pigs in distress, some screaming to escape, is deafening, as are the sounds of machinery—automatic feeders, automatic air extraction. Working in this environment must be awful for the humans, too. …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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