You are browsing the archive for 2019 July 10.

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Venus Williams wins Wimbledon for the first time

July 10, 2019 in History

By History.com Editors

On this day in 2000, Venus Williams wins at Wimbledon for the first time. Her victory over defending champion, Lindsay Davenport, made Williams the first black female Wimbledon champion since Althea Gibson won back-to-back titles in 1957 and 1958.

Overcoming a tough childhood in Compton, California, Williams became a champion women’s tennis player with seven Grand Slam singles titles, 16 Grand Slam doubles titles and four Olympic gold medals. Williams and her sister Serena are considered two of the greatest tennis players of all time.

Williams was born on June 17, 1980, in Lynwood, California. Her father, a self-taught tennis coach, trained his daughters on the local courts. When Williams was 10 years old, the family relocated to West Palm Beach, Florida so Venus and Serena could attend a tennis academy.

By the age of 10, Williams’ serve topped off at an impressive 100 miles per hour. Thanks to that serve and athletic prowess on the court, Williams was 63-0 on the United States Tennis Association junior tour.

On October 31, 1994, Williams turned pro at 14 years old. In 1997, she became the first woman since Pam Shriver in 1978 to reach the final of her first U.S. Open. In 1998, she won her first Grand Slam at the Australian Open. A year later, she won the French Open women’s doubles tournament with her sister.

When Williams won at Wimbledon in 2000, she said, “It’s really great because I’ve been working so hard all my life to be here… It’s strange. I’d go to bed at night and I’d dream I’d won a Grand Slam, but when I woke up, there was the nightmare. Now, I don’t have to wake up like that anymore.”

That same year she went on to win the U.S. Open, two gold medals at the 2000 Summer Olympic Games in Sydney and signed a $40 million sponsorship deal with Reebok.

In 2011, Williams revealed she was battling Sjögren syndrome, a chronic, incurable immune system disorder. Many expected her to take a step back from tennis. Instead, she went on to win gold at the 2012 Summer Olympics and the women’s doubles title at Wimbledon.

Since Venus Williams’ 2000 Wimbledon victory, she and her sister won 11 more Wimbledon trophies between them. The sisters also introduced an impressive brand of athletic play that influenced and advanced the game of women’s tennis.

…read more

Source: HISTORY

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1 million people attend funeral of Mao Zedong

July 10, 2019 in History

By History.com Editors

More than one million people gather at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing for the funeral of Mao Zedong, the leader of the Chinese Communist Party and chairman of the People’s Republic of China since 1949.

Mao, who died on September 9, 1976, at the age of 82, was born on December 26, 1893, to a peasant family in the Hunan province of central China. Trained to be a teacher, he helped found the Chinese Communist Party in 1921. After they claimed victory in a civil war with the nationalist party following WWII, Mao founded the People’s Republic of China and became its leader.

During an eight-day mourning period after his death, more than 1 million people paid their respects, as Mao’s body, in a flag-draped coffin, lay in state. At the start of the 30-minute public funeral in Tiananmen Square, a three-minute moment of silence was observed in honor of the leader, with reports that nearly all of China’s 800 million residents stood in silent tribute.

The ceremony included music from an army band that played a funeral march, China’s national anthem and the Communist “Internationale” and was televised live to the nation, which was a Chinese broadcast first. No foreign leaders were allowed to attend the service or the mourning period.

Hua Guofeng, China premier and Communist party first vice chairman who served as Mao’s immediate successor, delivered the eulogy. “It was under Chairman Mao’s leadership that the disaster-plagued Chinese nation rose to its feet,” he said. “The Chinese people love, trust and esteem Chairman Mao from the bottom of their hearts.”

READ MORE: What was Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution?

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Source: HISTORY

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Congress Needs to Settle the Looming Cannabis-Regulation Fight

July 10, 2019 in Economics

By Ilya Shapiro, Randal John Meyer

Ilya Shapiro and Randal John Meyer

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling in the
alcohol-regulation case Tennessee Wine & Spirits Retailers
Association v. Thomas
corrects an 80-year-old jurisprudential
error that raised the price of alcohol for generations. A
misunderstanding of the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition
while granting states power to regulate the “transportation
or importation” of alcohol, had allowed protectionist state
laws to interfere with interstate commerce. In striking down
Tennessee’s in-state-residency requirements for retail liquor
licenses, the Court held that the Volunteer State can’t
discriminate against outsiders willing to set up shop within its
borders.

Business licenses have nothing to do with whether a state
imports liquor, which is why, as the Supreme Court clarified,
protectionist regulations are no more valid in the alcohol market
than they would be for any other market. Now that the justices have
fixed that derogation of constitutional structure, it’s time for
Congress to learn from its misreading of regulatory power over
alcohol to ensure that state protectionism doesn’t replace federal
prohibition of another drug, cannabis.

The Supreme Court just
ruled that states can’t enact protectionist alcohol laws. Congress
should ensure that the same is true of cannabis in states where the
drug is legal.

Cannabis is a Schroedinger’s weed: simultaneously legal in many
states and illegal to transport across state lines under federal
law. As a result of this federalism quandary, it is unlike any
other commodity in the United States: Businesses must vertically
integrate all cannabis commerce within balkanized state
marketplaces.

In Gonzales v. Raich (2005), the Supreme Court ruled
that Congress’s regulatory authority over cannabis is virtually
limitless. We don’t agree with that ruling, but when you combine it
with Tennessee Wine, you find that Congress has
significant power to manage the growing cannabis industry, without
interference from insiders who would prefer to maintain their
state-specific fiefdoms.

Interest groups have coalesced around two competing policy
proposals on ending federal cannabis prohibition. One has the
potential to repeat and entrench the errors of Prohibition, taking
state protectionism outside the reach of commerce-clause
challenges. The other would treat cannabis like alcohol, breaking
up the status quo of balkanized state markets.
Cannabis-legalization proposals thus bifurcate into intrastate-only
policies and interstate ones.

Intrastate measures, like the Compassionate Access, Research
Expansion, and Respect States (CARERS) Act and the Strengthening
the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act, would
legalize cannabis within states but leave cannabis as a
Schedule I substance at the federal level, with any interstate
commerce treated as if it were cartel-style drug trafficking.

Interstate measures, like the Marijuana Revenue and Regulation
Act, instead would legalize the cannabis trade between states where
the drug is legal while allowing other states to maintain bans if
they …read more

Source: OP-EDS

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Dow suffers largest single-day drop

July 10, 2019 in History

By History.com Editors

After Congress failed to pass a $700 billion bank bailout plan, the Dow Jones Industrial Average falls 777.68 points—the largest single-day point loss in its history.

Down 7 percent, a greater loss than the 684.81 skid on September 17, 2001 (the first trading day post-9/11), the S&P 500 also suffered its biggest one-day loss since the 1987 crash, dropping 8.8 percent, and the Nasdaq fell 9.1 percent, its biggest single-day point loss in eight years.

The huge decline followed the bankruptcies of Wall Street brokerage firm Lehman Brothers, Savings and Loan bank Washington Mutual, as well as the Fed’s announcement that it would provide an $85 billion bailout for insurance provider American International Group (better known as AIG) to keep it from going under.

Also playing into things was a housing slowdown that triggered homeowners to suffer subprime mortgage defaults, widespread job losses and the Fed’s intervention to bail out investment bank Bear Stearns, as well as government-sponsored Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Congress’s inability to pass the Bush administration’s bill led to fears that the nearly frozen credit markets wouldn’t be able to rebound quickly, causing sellers to shed their stocks. The Dow drop equaled a whopping $1.2 trillion loss in market value, contributing to the 18-month-long Great Recession.

Congress eventually did pass a bailout bill, with Bush signing the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. The Dow drop remained the largest single-day point loss until 2018.

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Source: HISTORY

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U.S. women's soccer team wins record 4th World Cup title

July 10, 2019 in History

By History.com Editors

On this day in 2019, after a dominating tournament showing, the U.S. women’s national team brings home a record fourth FIFA World Cup title—its second in a row.

Held in host country France, the 2-0 final saw the United States facing the Netherlands, with the first goal scored in the match’s 61st minute. Following a video review, it was determined U.S. forward Alex Morgan, 30, had been fouled inside the penalty box, and forward Megan Rapinoe, 34, converted the penalty kick.

Eight minutes later, midfielder Rose Lavelle, 24, scored again on an 18-yard shot. Both Rapinoe and Lavelle had suffered hamstring injuries earlier in the tournament but were cleared to play. Rapinoe was awarded the tournament’s Golden Ball (for best player) and Golden Boot (for most goals—she tied Morgan and Ellen White of England with six a piece, but Rapinoe played fewer minutes).

The team set a women’s World Cup record with 26 goals and 12 straight wins, tying Germany as the only teams to score repeat championships. With four World Cup wins—in 1991, 1999, 2015 and 2019—the U.S. is the only team to have won more than two titles (no country other than Germany has won more than one title). The team’s 13-0 thrashing of Thailand in its opening match also set a record of most goals and largest margin of victory in a single World Cup game—by either men or women.

At the end of the final, fans chanted “Equal pay!” in support of an ongoing gender discrimination lawsuit by players Morgan, Rapinoe, Carli Lloyd and Becky Sauerbrunn against the U.S. Soccer Federation.

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Source: HISTORY

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How a Trio of Hellish Earthquakes Prompted America’s First Disaster Relief Act

July 10, 2019 in History

By Crystal Ponti


The New Madrid earthquakes.

In the early hours of December 16, 1811, the residents of New Madrid, a Mississippi River town once part of to streamline and speed up emergency response and assistance, and, in 1979, FEMA was created to unify federal disaster activity and build a comprehensive approach to emergency management.

Today, according to Grunwald, New Madrid is a typical small town in rural Missouri. Farming dominates the economy, and the population sits at about 3,000, around the same it was at the time of the earthquakes. Throughout the New Madrid Seismic Zone, especially along the fault line which runs 150 miles from Marked Tree, Arkansas, to Cairo, Illinois, and passing through southeast Missouri, the ground still quivers every now and then. It’s a stark reminder that Mother Nature remains in charge.

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Source: HISTORY