You are browsing the archive for 2020 May 01.

Avatar of admin

by admin

When a US Hospital Ship Was Attacked by a Kamikaze Pilot During WWII

May 1, 2020 in History

By Christopher Klein

After being hit by a Japanese suicide plane, the crew of the USS Comfort were forced to tend to their own.

Through war and peace, American hospital ships have served the country since 1804 and the First Barbary War. Although these floating hospitals embark on missions of mercy, they have also become casualties of war. During …read more

Source: HISTORY

Avatar of admin

by admin

How Lincoln and Grant's Partnership Won the Civil War

May 1, 2020 in History

By Christopher Klein

Abraham Lincoln was disappointed by most of his generals—but not Ulysses S. Grant.

President Abraham Lincoln and General Ulysses S. Grant didn’t meet often in person. But their mutual respect and trust grew deep over the final year of the Civil War as they together steered America and its armies through the most convulsive period in the nation’s history.

In his memoirs, Grant confessed that he was “by no means a ‘Lincoln man’” in the years before the firing of the first shots of the Civil War at Fort Sumter, South Carolina. By the time General Grant accepted the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox, however, the cauldron of four years of war had forged a strong partnership between Grant and Lincoln—one that, for all intents and purposes, saved the Union.

“I think it was Grant’s aggressive, fighting spirit that endeared him to Lincoln,” says Ron Chernow, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Grant. Not only was the general a self-starter, but he had a quiet self-confidence and a refreshing willingness to accept full responsibility for his battlefield defeats. “Too many of Lincoln’s generals were quick to scapegoat him for their failures,” says Chernow, “whereas Grant, as a matter of both pride and honesty, never blamed the president.”

GRANT, a three-night miniseries event, premieres Memorial Day at 9/8c on HISTORY. Watch a preview:

Similar life stories bonded the men as well. Both overcame hardscrabble upbringings in the American heartland, married into slaveholding families and suffered periodic bouts of depression. With their modest Midwestern backgrounds came a shared democratic ethos: “Grant put on no airs with his men and treated officers and ordinary soldiers with similar courtesy,” Chernow says. “This appealed to Lincoln, who also showed a common touch with soldiers.”

Grant’s ascent in the west

With his prairie roots, Lincoln knew that the Civil War’s western theater and control of the Mississippi River would be vital to Union success, so Grant’s early victories in the region caught the president’s eye. While Lincoln seethed during 1862 at the plodding pace of General George McClellan and the Army of the Potomac, he admired Grant’s swift action in capturing Fort Donelson and Fort Henry in Tennessee.

When his troops were taken by surprise at the bloody Battle of Shiloh in April 1862 and floundered for months outside Vicksburg, Mississippi, Grant faced sharp charges of incompetence—and …read more

Source: HISTORY

Avatar of admin

by admin

Kent State Shootings: A Timeline of the Tragedy

May 1, 2020 in History

By Sarah Pruitt

A weekend of escalating tensions exploded into 13 seconds of gunfire—and four dead in Ohio.

On May 4, 1970, members of the Ohio National Guard trying to disperse a crowd of student demonstrators at Kent State University opened fire, killing four students and wounding nine others.

More than any other single event, the …read more

Source: HISTORY