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McConnell thinks Trump committed impeachable acts — and wants Democrats to move forward: report

January 12, 2021 in Blogs

By Cody Fenwick

Outgoing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell believes President Donald Trump committed impeachable acts related to the insurrection on the U.S. Capitol, according to a report Tuesday in the New York Times, and he is pleased that the Democrats are moving forward with a plan to push for his removal.

Democrats plan to vote on an impeachment article on Wednesday, which is expected to pass, and McConnell reportedly said he wants to see what final form it takes. The report does not expressly say McConnell would be looking to fast-track impeachment or that he would even vote in favor of removal himself.

However, it said that McConnell believes impeachment “will make it easier to purge” Trump from the Republican Party. It’s not clear exactly what this means, but impeachment theoretically would give the Senate the opportunity to prevent Trump from taking office again.

The story also noted that around a dozen Republicans in the House may vote for impeachment. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy has made it clear that he opposes impeachment, but the Times found that he is not lobbying his caucus to oppose it. And he has reportedly pushed the idea of censuring the president as an alternative to impeachment, saying he could get substantial GOP support for such a measure, though House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has dismissed the idea.

CNN’s Manu Raju confirmed the report:

Right before the siege of the Capitol on Jan. 6, McConnell delivered a speech in the building finally denouncing Trump and his allies’ efforts to overturn the election result.

“The voters, the courts, and the states have all spoken,” he said. “They’ve all spoken. If we overrule them, it would damage our republic forever.”

…read more

Source: ALTERNET

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GOP governor during Flint water crisis will be charged: report

January 12, 2021 in Blogs

By The New Civil Rights Movement

Republican Governor Rick Snyder of Michigan, whose actions led to the Flint water crisis that flowed poisonous water in to 100,000 homes and businesses, will be charged after an investigation by that state’s new Attorney General, Dana Nessel.

“Snyder, his health director and other ex-officials have been told they’re being charged after a new investigation of the Flint water scandal, which devastated the majority Black city with lead-contaminated water and was blamed for a deadly outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in 2014-15,” The Associated Press reports.

The AP’s Michigan government/politics correspondent David Eggert:

The disaster was headline news for months. It started when Gov. Snyder decided to appoint his own manager to run the city, a tactic MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow was among the first to decry as dangerous and possibly unconstitutional. In what was called a cost-saving measure Flint’s water supply was switched to a different source, and contaminated water that subsequently also destroyed water pipes, leeching lead into drinking water, flowed.

“The outbreak was announced by Snyder and Lyon in January 2016, although Lyon conceded that he knew that cases were being reported many months earlier,” the AP notes.

Flint youth activist Amariyanna Copeny, known as Little Miss Flint, points out years after the disaster began Flint’s water system is still not fixed.

NBC’s Geoff Bennett weighs in:

Physician who sounded the alarm over rise in lead levels in children’s blood:

…read more

Source: ALTERNET

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Internet slams Trump for saying his inflammatory speech ahead of the Capitol riot was 'totally appropriate'

January 12, 2021 in Blogs

By Meaghan Ellis

As impeachment looms over President Donald Trump’s final days in office, he is standing by the damaging “Save America” speech he delivered during the critical time leading up to the U.S. Capitol riots. And many Twitter users are not impressed.

After days of seclusion, Trump emerged from the White House as he prepared for his departure from Joint Base Andrews to visit the U.S. border wall. Despite heightened criticism over his incriminating remarks, Trump claims his words were “totally appropriate,” according to The Hill.

“They’ve analyzed my speech and my words and my final paragraph, my final sentence, and everybody to the tthought it was totally appropriate,” Trump said. It’s not clear who or what “analyzed” Trump’s speech that he’s referring to, but it’s worth noting that even many of the president’s close allies, such as former Chief of Staff John Kely and former Attorney General Bill Barr, have sharply denounced his role in the attack.

The president also pivoted with an attempt to downplay the U.S. Capitol riot by comparing it to the civil rights protests and riots that took place over the summer. He added, “If you look at what other people have said — politicians at a high level — about the riots during the summer, the horrible riots in Portland and Seattle … That was a real problem.”

Despite the president’s claims, his remarks subsequently contributed to the delayed certification of the Electoral College vote as his angry supporters storming the U.S. Capitol. The disturbing series of events that transpired have also led to a nationwide crackdown on domestic terrorism.

Now Twitter users are firing back at the embattled president over his latest deflection attempt. Not mincing words, Twitter users slammed Trump for his refusal to accept responsibility for his actions. Many have noted that Trump’s latest stunt further proves just how unfit he is to serve as president.

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CNN host reveals the damning evidence that Republicans knew how dangerous Trump was all along

January 12, 2021 in Blogs

By Alex Henderson

During the final days of his presidency, Donald Trump’s critics are blaming him for the storming of the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6 by far-right extremists. But CNN’s Brianna Keilar, in a blistering commentary this week, stressed that Trump was appealing to extremists long before January 6 — and she made her point by airing a supercut video devoted to Republicans who called out Trump as dangerous and unhinged in 2016 before they became obsequious Trump sycophants.

The video shows clips of Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, Fox News pundit Kayleigh McEnany (who went on to became White House press secretary), Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, then-South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and former Texas Gov. Rick Perry lambasting Trump in 2016. All of them, Keilar noted, “went on to broadly support or work for Trump’s administration — ignoring his nods to extremists, acting like they didn’t see his tweets, playing whataboutism with liberals instead of acknowledging the uniquely troubling nature of President Trump. And all of that emboldened him to fulfill the predictions of these Republicans who sounded the alarm on Donald Trump and then pretended, for years, that it wasn’t going off.”

Keilar went on to say, “Of all the Republican predictions, (Sen.) Marco Rubio’s might have been the most prescient of all of them.” The CNN anchor showed a 2016 clip of Rubio saying, “There’s only one presidential candidate who has violence at their events.” But that, Keilar told CNN viewers, was before Rubio “drank the Kool Aid.”

On March 15, 2016, Keilar noted, Rubio warned, “If we’re going to be the party of fear, we’re going to spend some time in the wilderness. If we’re the party of fear with a candidate who basically is trying to prey upon people’s fears to get them to vote for them, I think we’re going to pay a big price in November and beyond. I don’t know how all this is going to end. This is uncharted territory.”

Keilar added that after Trump won the 2016 election and became president, only one Republican senator, Utah’s Mitt Romney, truly “stood up to” him.

“Mitt Romney was the lone Republican who voted to convict Trump in his impeachment trial, and he has been living on an island all by himself, standing up to the president,” Keilar explained. “No one visits, not even for a long …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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Conservative explains how GOP became a cult of 'victimhood' and 'self-pity'

January 12, 2021 in Blogs

By Alex Henderson

In the past, many conservatives and Republicans slammed liberalism for promoting a victim mentality. Right-wing radio host Larry Elder coined the term “victicrat” during the 1990s and used it to defame liberals and progresses. But Never Trump conservative David Frum, in an article published by The Atlantic this week, argues that a sense of victimhood is a prime ingredient of today’s Republican Party and supporters of President Donald Trump.

Frum opens his article by discussing the disturbing events of January 6, when a violent mob of far-right Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol Building in the hope of preventing Congress from certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory. As they saw it, Frum notes, Trump has been robbed of a victory by widespread voter fraud — a conspiracy theory that has been totally debunked but plays into the sense of victimhood that is a key element of Trumpism and the modern GOP.

“After the attempted coup, the mood in the pro-Trump world became one of profoundest self-pity,” Frum explains. “The president’s supporters compare themselves to victims of Stalin’s purges, to the unpersons of George Orwell’s ’1984′. They watch their Twitter followers disappear as the company closes QAnon accounts, and they feel persecuted. They invoke Martin Niemöller’s famous poem about Nazi Germany: First, they came for those who plotted the violent overthrow of the U.S. government, and I said nothing.”

Countless far-right pundits have accused the mainstream media of having an anti-Trump bias, but Frum argues that many in the mainstream media have made the mistake of indulging the self-pity of Trump supporters.

“Over the past half-decade,” Frum writes, “we have turned much of the country’s mindscape into a group therapy session for Trump believers. Reporters play the part of the therapist, reassuring the analyzed of a safe space for their grievances and complaints. The pro-Trump world has accepted the invitation. “

Frum notes that a sense of victimhood is being expressed by prominent Republicans like Sen. Ted Cruz and Sen. Josh Hawley, both of whom promoted the debunked conspiracy theory of a stolen election.

“Hawley described himself as a victim of a ‘woke mob’ after his publisher terminated his book contract because of his leadership role in propagating the falsehoods …read more

Source: ALTERNET

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Martin Luther King, Jr. is jailed; writes "Letter from a Birmingham Jail"

January 12, 2021 in History

By History.com Editors

On April 3, 1963, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his Southern Christian Leadership Conference and their partners in the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights led a campaign of protests, marches and sit-ins against segregation in Birmingham, Alabama. By April 12, King was in prison along with many of his fellow activists. While imprisoned, King penned an open letter now known as his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” a full-throated defense of the Birmingham protest campaign that is now regarded as one of the greatest texts of the civil rights movement.

On April 12, Good Friday, King and dozens of his fellow protestors were arrested for continuing to demonstrate in the face of an injunction obtained by Commissioner of Public Safety Theophilus Eugene “Bull” Connor. Connor, who had just lost the mayoral election, remains one of the most notorious pro-segregationists in American history thanks to the brutal methods his forces employed against the Birmingham protestors that summer. The man who had won the election, Albert Boutwell, was also a segregationist, and he was one of many who accused “outsiders”—he clearly meant King—of stirring up trouble in Birmingham. As he sat in a solitary jail cell without even a mattress to sleep on, King began to pen a response to his critics on some scraps of paper.

The resulting letter was addressed to “Fellow Clergymen” who had criticized the protest campaign. King first dispensed with the idea that a preacher from Atlanta was too much of an “outsider” to confront bigotry in Birmingham, saying, “I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” While stressing the importance of non-violence, he rejected the idea that his movement was acting too fast or too dramatically: “We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was ‘well timed’ in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation.” King also advocated for violating unjust laws and urged that believers in organized religion “[break] loose from the paralyzing chains of conformity.” All told, the lengthy letter constituted a defense of nonviolent protest, a call …read more

Source: HISTORY

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The Deadliest Events in US History

January 12, 2021 in History

By Dave Roos

From natural disasters to wars, to pandemics, these events took the highest tolls on American lives.

It’s a grim but necessary calculation, counting those Americans who have died in service to their country, as targets of terrorist attacks, amid natural disasters or as victims of pandemic disease. From the solemn statistics below, it’s clear that loss and suffering are woven into the fabric of American history.

The Attack on Pearl Harbor: 2,390

Enlisted men of the Naval Air Station at Kaneohe, Hawaii, place leis on the graves of their comrades killed in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in this 1942 photo.

In the early dawn hours of December 7, 1941, a swarm of nearly 90 Japanese aircraft converged on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor on Oahu, Hawaii. The hours-long

The COVID-19 Pandemic: 357,000 (And Counting)


Olivia Grant (R) hugs her grandmother, Mary Grace Sileo through a plastic drop cloth hung up on a homemade clothes line during Memorial Day Weekend in Wantagh, New York, May 24, 2020. It was the first time they have had contact of any kind since the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic lockdown started in late February.

In early 2020, the first reports circulated of a deadly and contagious new respiratory disease centered in Wuhan, China. The novel strain of coronavirus claimed its first American victims in February and COVID-19, as the disease became known, erupted into a full-blown public health crisis by March, triggering widespread shutdowns of U.S. schools and businesses, and stay-at-home orders in panicked states nationwide.

New York was the first to suffer an explosion of infections and deaths, registering more than 200,000 positive cases and at least 14,000 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 deaths in the first three months of the pandemic. As public health restrictions were relaxed over the summer, the virus spread to new hotspots and steadily claimed more and more lives, reaching daily death totals in excess of the 9/11 attacks by late fall.

As of January 2021, with the first rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, the confirmed COVID-19 death toll was 357,000, but disease models project America will surpass 560,000 deaths by April 1, 2021.

READ MORE: Pandemics

The 1918 Flu Pandemic: 675,000

The Spanish Flu Was Deadlier Than WWI (TV-PG; 5:42)

WATCH: The 1918 Flu Was Deadlier Than WWI

The 1918 flu claimed an unfathomable 50 to 100 million victims worldwide, including an estimated 675,000 Americans. Wrongfully labeled the …read more

Source: HISTORY